Pets and Staging Your Home


Staging your home for potential buyers can be quite the hassle. You may start moving your furniture around spontaneously, or become tense when your children or spouse make messes in a room that you just prepped for show. With all of the planning that one can put into making their home shine, one crucial step in home staging is often overlooked: your family pet.

For the sake of simplicity, I will outline a few things that you must keep in mind when cleaning up after your pet in a home for sale.

Pet presence – For obvious reasons, some pets can’t leave the house. Giant enclosures, aquariums, and disabled pets are hard to relocate sometimes, and a lot of people will be understanding of this. But if your dog or cat is healthy, then you’ll want to strongly consider relocating your pets temporarily. Many people aren’t pet owners, and don’t like being around an excitable golden retriever or a yippy chihuahua when they are trying to imagine their family occupying your home. Remember….You are trying to make the potential buyer as relaxed as possible. Ask a friend if they wouldn’t mind looking after your loved one for a bit, and if all else fails, look into a reputable boarding service for your pet.

Fur – Fur can get everywhere. Even in places that you, as a resident of your home, don’t necessarily notice all of the time. Be sure to give your couches, chairs, and love seats proper attention. That means taking the pillows and cushions off, and using a hand vacuum or brush to remove all of the fur you see. After you are sure that they are thoroughly cleaned, use a fabric freshener to finish it off. Try to do this well in advance of the potential buyer, as some people have sensitivities to fabric fresheners.

Litter – No matter what kind of animal you have, odds are you have do deal with some form of waste. It may sound pretty obvious, but make sure your litter beds are clean and well hidden. Even if you own an exotic pet like a reptile of amphibian, this includes you too. Many people don’t like snakes, but they’ll like a messy snake cage even less. Another important thing to remember as an exotic pet owner is this: even though you may not be able to smell anything offensive coming from your reptile’s cage, that doesn’t mean that there isn’t an odor. Many people who live with reptiles get used to the subtle odors that emit from the cages, and will tend to spot-clean their animal’s cage without giving it the proper scrub-down that it needs.

Odors – Don’t use air fresheners to mask pet odor. It is meant to freshen the air…Not cover pet odors up. Instead, use powdered cleaners on carpets and rugs that your pets frequent. These can be purchased at your local pet store in the cleaning isle. Odds are, if someone has a severe allergy to animals, then they are going to be at risk of having a reaction. The cleaner the house, the less dander will be in the home.

Homemade Mildew Remover

Do you have a mildew buildup in your home? Or are you looking to prevent mildew? You can combat mildew buildup with ingredients you have around your home. Many of the ingredients in store-bought mildew cleaners contain hazardous solvents and petroleum based chemicals, which may contaminate ground water and present a problem to waste water treatment facilities.

Here is a recipe to remove mildew:

 

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon powdered laundry detergent
1 quart chlorine bleach
2 quarts water

1. Combine all the ingredients in a pail.

2. Wearing rubber gloves, wash off the mildew.

So go ahead and whip up a batch of homemade mildew cleaner. It will cost you only pennies and keep your family safer too.

Tub/Shower Faucet Temperature

Do you have a bathtub faucet the will not run hot enough water for a hot soak in the tub, or have you ever scalded yourself when you accidentally bumped into the control lever with an elbow while showering?

Both of these are common household problems you can fix by adjusting the maximum temperature of the faucet. It only takes a few minutes of your time and basic home tools. In most cases, after a bit of testing and adjustment, you will have your showerhead or bathroom faucet working exactly the way you want it to.

How Bathroom Fixture Levers Work

Modern single lever shower faucets are typically designed with up to 270 degrees of rotation. When the lever is rotated approximately 45 degrees from the “off” position, the cold water flow is fully engaged. However the hot water remains off. When you continue to rotate the handle, the hot water begins to flow. At approximately 135 degrees of rotation, both the hot and cold water flow are fully engaged. As you continue to rotate the lever, the hot water flow stays on while the cold flow is restricted. At about 270 degrees, the hot water is fully on and the cold-water flow is totally off.

A Simple Adjustment

Single-lever faucets are designed to be adjustable and the amount of rotation limited. Keep in mind; it is only at the full 270 degrees of rotation that you obtain only hot water. At a less than 270-degree rotation, cold water continues to blend with the hot water flow. If find that the faucet lever will not rotate a full 270 degrees, cold water is continually mixing with the hot flow: the shorter the rotation, the colder water added and the cooler the maximum temperature. Most single shower faucets are set at the factory to prevent total rotation to prevent scalding water causing a bathroom accident with children or the elderly. A simple adjustment will allow you to raise the water temperature to your comfort level while still preventing a total hot flow, which could result in injury.

Look Under The Faucet Handle

Take a look at the faucet handle to locate the piece of metal or plastic that covers the screw that holds the faucet in place. You can quickly “pop” out the metal or plastic screw cover to loosen the screw and remove the handle. Some older model faucets may have a hole hidden on the underside, requiring a tiny screwdriver or Allen wrench to remove.

Once you have removed the handle, you will be able to locate a collar with a small plastic tab sticking out. If the handle were in place, that little plastic tab would stop the rotation before the “maximum hot” position. To visualize how this works look inside the handle or try sliding it back in place and turn the faucet on and off.

Some faucet designs have collars with two tabs. On the back collar, the nub is always set straight up, at the 12 o’clock position. The other nub can be pulled out and rotated to the desired setting and reinserted. Remember that the farther away the nub is set from 12 o’clock, the more restricted the lever’s rotation and the cooler the maximum temperature.

Other older designs of the single level faucet may present hot and cold adjustment screws. To adjust, always turn the hot water screw counterclockwise, while the cold-water screw turns clockwise.